Beverly Hills Diet Reviews and Ratings

Added Oct 09, 2014 | 1,315 views |
Nutritionist Rating 2.0
Weight Loss
2.0
Difficulty
0.0
Cost
4.0
Legitimacy
1.0
Time
5.0
Safety
0.0
Morgan Medeiros

THIS DIET REVIEWED BY

Morgan is a doctoral candidate in the field of clinical nutrition and nutritional neuroscience, having received her bachelors degree from Central Washington University.

Overview of Beverly Hills Diet

According to the Beverly Hills Diet, by adhering to a fruit-based diet for 35 days, followed by strict macronutrient guidelines and food combining rules, dieters can expect to lose 10-15 lbs in 5 weeks, and continue to lose weight thereafter. Mazel theorizes that a diet comprised primarily of fruit will help “retrain” the digestive tract and that foods combining improperly is the true cause of weight gain. It should be noted that this is not a scientifically supported theory; weight gain and weight loss depend on Caloric balance. However, according to Mazel, as long as dieters divide fruit, other carbohydrates, and proteins into three categories, and do not eat any of the two together, they will lose weight.

Diet origins

The Beverly Hills diet was created not by a dietitian, doctor, or other expert formally trained in nutrition. Rather, it was spawned in 1981 by Judy Mazel, who passed away in 2007 at the age of 63. Before her death, Mazel ran a weight loss clinic in Beverly Hills, and wrote The Beverly Hills Diet based on principles she had used to lose 72 lbs.

How easy is it to follow?

Some dieters may be able to stick to the plan for the 35-day induction phase, but would be ill advised to do so. Very few dieters would be able to comply with the Beverly Hills plan long-term, the consequences of which would be damaging.

What are the costs required?

The only costs to Beverly Hills dieters are that of the guidebook and groceries.

Will this diet be time consuming?

This diet takes no more time than any other diet or lifestyle plan.

How safe is this diet?

The Beverly Hills Diet is not a safe dietary option; it is severely limiting and unnecessary for all dieters, but is particularly dangerous for those with insulin resistance, diabetes, or pre-diabetes.

Is this diet legitmate?

The Beverly Hills diet is highly contended. The diet’s food combination theory is not grounded in any scientific evidence, and engages dieters in unnecessary and dangerous dieting behaviors to help promote weight loss.

The breakdown

Benefits: The Beverly Hills diet is inexpensive and not very time consuming, but there are little to no benefits besides that.

Downsides: The Beverly Hills diet is severely and unnecessarily limiting. The diet lacks scientific support, and fails to provide accurate, effective nutrition education. Dieters will likely incur nutritional deficiencies, and may resort to psychologically damaging binge behaviors.

The Bottom Line: The Beverly Hills Diet is limited and lacks any scientific support.


CATEGORIES: Weight Loss, Not Suitable For Diabetes, Not Suitable For Many Pre-exisitng Conditions

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